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The American Legion
 Paris Post #1 Mausoleum
Neuilly Cemetery Near Paris

A Monument to American Veterans

The plot for the mausoleum was donated by the City of Neuilly in June 1937.  It is located in the New Cemetery of Neuilly.  The mausoleum was constructed with donations from individuals and firms from around the world.   It was completed and put into use in April 1939.  It contains burial plots and niches for urns.  The names of those buried in the mausoleum are carved into the granite and gilded.  At the time of construction a granite name panel was built in the center of the monument.  It has since been filled with names.  Two other name panels have been added, one on the right side and one on the left side. The panel on the right side has also been filled with names. The panel on the left side has several names on it. Photos of the panels are shown below.

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 Center Name Panel

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Right Name Panel

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Left Name Panel

The Standard Operating Procedure governing the use of the mausoleum was last updated and approved by the Post Executive Committee at the regular meeting on February 17, 2003.  The text of that procedure follows: 

Standard Operating Procedure 6—Post Mausoleum 

1.  Purpose: Paris Post 1 owns and maintains a Mausoleum and Legion Monument in the new cemetery of Neuilly, located in the community of Neuilly in the Hauts de Seine Department.  The purpose of the Standard Operating Procedure is to establish the rules concerning the use of this mausoleum and the respective responsibilities of the Post and the surviving family members. 

2.  Eligibility: To be eligible to be buried in full sized coffins, members must have three years paid up continuous membership at the date of their deaths.  This includes unmarried members of the Paris Post One Ladies Auxiliary.  In addition, spouses of members in good standing may also be buried if both spouses agree to be cremated.  This measure is necessary due to the limited space available for full sized coffins.  In the case where the spouse precedes the member in death, and burial with the member is desired, the cremated remains must be stored by the member in order to have them interred in the mausoleum at the same time as the member’s cremated remains. 

3.  Formalities: The Post Service Officer will provide necessary assistance and guidance to the surviving family members to accomplish the necessary formalities required for burial in the mausoleum.  All cost, including transportation of the remains, opening and closing of the grave and all local and national taxes will be paid by the surviving family. 

4.  Engraving:  The names of all those presently buried in the mausoleum are engraved on the marble slab behind the Legion emblem.  This engraving is done by a company agreed to by the post in order to maintain standard size and quality.  The cost of the engraving will be paid by the surviving family.  The Post Service Officer will assist in making the arrangements for the engraving. 

5.  Upkeep:  The monument and mausoleum are established for perpetual care by the cemetery custodian; however the Post does pay for this upkeep annually.  Surviving families who are able to do so are asked to make a donation to the Post in memory of the dead person, either at the time of burial or at any other convenient time.  It is suggested that persons who intend to be buried in the mausoleum make some provision in their wills or testaments to cover this cost. 

6.  Procedure: Any person wishing to be buried in the mausoleum should write a letter so stating this wish with one copy to the Post Service Officer, and copies to family members such that no questions will arise to preclude the burial when the time arrives.  Finally, cremation is recommended in order to assure adequate space in the mausoleum for the years to come. 

(signed)
Clarita Geoghegan
Post Commander